Directory results

 
Result 1 of 4 results
  • Frequently Asked Employment Questions - As a small employer how should we reject a flexible working request?
    The Employment Rights Act 1996 states the ways a flexible working request can be rejected. For a smaller business some options are better than others; the best ones to use are the burden of additional costs and recruitment/staffing issues. This is because the most likely scenario to cause you problems is when an employee wants to go part-time and suggests that you employ a job-sharer or create a new part-time position. If so, focus on the higher costs that having two employees instead of one will introduce,...
    Click here
  • Frequently Asked Employment Questions - How do we revoke a flexible working arrangement?
    Although the rights to request and reject a flexible working arrangement are set out in the Employment Rights Act 1996, it makes no provision regarding the revocation of an arrangement. So if you want to do this it will be a contractual matter. You'll need sound business reasons why: (1) you need to revoke the terms; (2) it affects this particular employee; and (3) there's no other solution, such as reallocating duties. Once you have this information, meet with the employee to explain the situation and seek...
    Click here
  • Frequently Asked Employment Questions - Is it true that flexible working is now open to all?
    Yes. Provided the employee has 26 weeks' continuous service they can now apply for flexible working regardless of their reason for wanting it. There is a duty on employers to deal with requests reasonably, and there is a statutory code of practice giving practical guidance. Tip. Your staff only have the right to request (not have) flexible working and you are still able to refuse it.
    Click here
  • Frequently Asked Employment Questions - What are the main points to bear in mind when considering a job-share request?
    One area that's often overlooked is the need to estimate the true costs of a job-share. Whilst an employee may argue that it's two employees for the price of one, it may not always be the case in practice, so do your sums. For example, you'll have twice the cost of training, National Insurance contributions and benefit packages, e.g. gym membership and private health insurance. You may also need to factor-in the costs of having two staff present for a weekly handover period. In terms of workload, you also need...
    Click here
 
Result 1 of 4 results